From directional drilling to vacuum excavation and trenching, take a look at some of our photographs from the archives of Dig Different this past year


You learn a lot about a company in the profiles we run in each issue, but if you take a moment to look at the photos that accompany those profiles, they can tell you even more.

Those photos, taken by photographers throughout North America, show the hard work contractors do each day, the toughest jobs they take on, how seriously they take safety, and the dedication they have to the industry.

Not every photo that we receive from a photographer gets published. Below you will see our top 10 favorite photos in Dig Different in 2017.

Related: Need a Tax Break? Buy a Truck!

We hope you enjoy this look back:​

Stefano D'Emilia, right, and Mike Flaherty, of APC Corporation, perform a high-rail vacuum excavation service with a GapVax vacuum truck at the Stiles & Hart Brick Company located on Cook Street in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. APC Corporation was profiled in Dig Different in the March issue. (Photography by Richard T. Gagnon)

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John Raring, environmental division lead with Greenfield Services, Inc., excavates with a pressure washer and a Vac-Con hydroexcavator at the Port of Tacoma, Washington. Greenfield Services was profiled in Dig Different in the January issue. (Photography by David Ryder)

 

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SSC Global operators Jake Conley, right, and Tony Gamez use a VACMASTERS air excavator on a job site in Phoenix, Arizona. SSC Global was profiled in the March issue of Dig Different. (Photography by Mark Henle)

 

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REM Directional crewmembers attach a new length of pipe for the Herrenknecht HK250C directional drill rig. The crew is drilling a pilot hole on a 1,500-foot job through rock in Tennessee. REM Directional is a directional drilling company based in Boligee, Alabama. REM Directional was featured in the August issue of Dig Different. (Photography by Keyhole Photo)

 

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REM Directional crewmembers attach a new length of pipe for the Herrenknecht HK250C directional drill rig. The crew is drilling a pilot hole on a 1,500-foot job through rock in Tennessee. REM Directional is a directional drilling company based in Boligee, Alabama. REM Directional was featured in the August issue of Dig Different. (Photography by Keyhole Photo)

C.D.B. Underground Utility Contractors’ Logan Heydeman attaches a 2-inch conduit line to a directional drill bit that will then be pulled back through the bore. C.D.B. Underground Utility, based in Davenport, Iowa, specializes in utility installation services including directional drilling, trenching and fiber blowing. The company serves all of Iowa and western Illinois. C.D.B. Underground Utility Contractors were featured in the January issue of Dig Different. (Photography by Mark Hirsch)

Midwest Mole foreman Jeff Hayden operates McElroy T500 Fusing Machine to fuse pipe together on a project requiring over 1,000 feet of pipe in Rossville, Indiana. Dig Different featured Midwest Mole in the August issue. (Photography by Marc Lebryk) 

Operator Marcus Soraiz, left, and swamper Juan Ortiz, both with Landshark Hydro Excavation Inc., pothole for new light posts in Houston. Dig Different featured Landshark Hydro Excavation in the September/October issue. (Photography by Mark Mulligan)

Accurate Trenching operator Marco Gutierrez confirms the depth of a run of linear trench using the company's workhorse, a Cleveland Model 236, as part of a 8,000-foot agricultural irrigation job in California's Central Valley outside Bakersfield, California. Accurate Trenching was highlighted in the February issue of Dig Different. (Photography by Collin Chappelle)

B&T Drainage technician Colby Boyer uses a hydroexcavator while working a job in Marshall, Illinois. The team was working on a project to install an approximately 20 mile long utility line from Marshall to Casey, Illinois. B&T Drainage was profiled in the May/June issue of Dig Different. (Photography by Bradley Leeb)


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